What’s It Like to Work for an International Humanitarian Organization?

What’s it like to work for a medical humanitarian organization? I’ve always been interested in and fascinated by those who choose to work in parts of the world where either disaster, war, famine or poor governance has created a dire medical situation.  These heroes are a special breed of humanitarian. Most of what they do is never celebrated or publicized to match the degree of their sacrifice and hardships in war zones and disaster areas.  While we always think of the doctors and nurses first in these organizations, there is an entire administrative team behind the lines working to get the medical staff what they need in order to do their work. Lainie’s path to working for a medical humanitarian organization began after her first volunteer job in Cambodia with an Australian Government program similar to the Peace Corps.Working for a Medical Humanitarian Organization, South Sudan In the past five years, she’s found her calling in this organization working as an administrator in the field with medical teams – making a difference doing useful work serving people in great need. Her original area of study was communications followed by work as an administrator in small businesses, while volunteering her spare time for community organizations. Since her initial assignment in Cambodia – she has worked in Kenya, South Sudan, Kyrgyzstan and Myanmar, and is presently in a position in Geneva headquarters. I spoke with her about how she got involved with this organization, what it’s like to be out in the field and what it takes to endure the challenges as well as the unique rewards of helping those in need.

 

Click here for the transcript of the podcast – Working For A Medical Humanitarian Organization / Lainie

Comments, questions? – now it’s your turn 

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